How has the character of conflict changed since 9/11?

Written by Kanyinsola Adetunmbi

Conflict is a reality of society, which could have numerous sides and participants. However, this essay will assess the characteristics of conflict specifically from the angle of the United States and the threat of terrorism and insurgency.  The 9/11 attacks were a significant moment in the change of paradigm of war and conflict. 19 terrorists, funded and affiliated with the Al Qaeda Islamist extremist group hijacked three American airlines loaded with 20,000 gallons of jet fuel and crashed into the World Trade Centre twin towers, and the Pentagon, killing over 3,000 American civilians (History, 2010). This attack on US soil catapulted terrorism and insurgency to the forefront of discourse on war and conflict.

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Terrorism as Genocide: The Impact of a Revolution in Military Intelligence in an Era of Unconventional Warfare

Written by Tyler Goudal

This paper will explore whether or not a revolution in military intelligence (RMI) is a feasible concept built off the ideals of a revolution in military affairs (RMA). Using the argument of John Ferris (2009) as the origin for this analysis, the case study of terrorism as genocide – as discussed by Whiteside (2015), Perry (2012), and Martin & Weinberg (2016) – will contextualize the argument of whether or not the concept of RMA can be applied to intelligence. Owens (1994), Ibrügger (1998), and Barger (2005) provide the definition and framework for analysis of these two concepts.

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Rashan Charles and the real mission of ‘Black Lives Matter’

Written by Dagless Kangero

Social tensions continue to rise within the American diaspora underlined by racial discrepancies: those of black ethnicity falling victim accredited to an institutionalized oppression. The overall argument of the essay is that on the back of the human rights doctrine, incarceration and police brutality is a way to destroy and cleanse an ethnic minority. Factually alike events have driven the mass protests with the same fine tune of challenging the justice system when lives are depleted in the hands of the police force. On that account, this essay will discuss the context of Black Lives Matter in the current political era and its inevitable relevance to identity politics on a global scale.

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Why do religious sects play a role in Mexico’s drug war?

Written by Victoria Dittmar

Religion has again gained plitical attention since the end of last nentury and the beginning of the present one (Petito and Hatzopoulos, 2003). A so-called ‘resurgence’ of religion is being discussed in the recent academic literature based on the appearance that a growing number of global issues are somehow influenced by religious elements, such as religiously inspired terrorism, inter-religious conflicts or the role of religious leaders in international affairs. This has called for an inclusion of religion in the study of international relations (Cochran Bech and Snyder, 2011). It is debatable whether religion has actually ‘resurged’ or not, but many scholars who assume it did, argue that a possible reason is the failure of secularism and the search for cultural authenticity (Thomas, 2003). Policy makers around the world are now increasingly taking the role of religion into account while dealing with issues like conflict, international development, peacebuilding and foreign policy (see Appleby et al., 2010; DFID, 2012).

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Are China or Russia the biggest threat to a Western-dominated world order?

Written by Toshiki Tabata

This essay is going to discuss whether Russia or China could be a threat to the current world order that Western countries dominate. To answer this question, some further questions have to be clarified: how could those countries even be a threat to the current liberal world order? If they can be  a threat, how will they have an impact on the world order?

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The Battle of Hegemonic Influence in Thailand Between China and the US

Written by Worawut Tubtim


 

In an attempt to define hegemony (Yilmaz, 2010, p.195) stated “hegemony is the position of having the capability and power to change the rules and norms of international systems based on one’s own motivation and desire”. Furthermore, he goes on to explain, “a hegemon creates or maintains critical regimes to cooperate in the future”. In order to explain how China became a hegemon it Is important to understand how hegemons come to be. In their book Hegemony and Socialist Strategy, Laclau and Mouffe (1985) suggested that a hegemonic relationship is a result of political discourse.

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If the conflict between insurgents and counterinsurgents is ‘a competition in government’ then what is the nature of the government offered through counterinsurgency rule?

Written by Victoria Dittmar


Counterinsurgency has been the most common form of warfare for the West since the end of the Second World War (Sitaraman, 2012; Kilcullen, 2013). From the anti-colonial uprisings against European Empires to the latest US-led campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, what has been at stake in these conflicts are arguably no longer material gains disputed between different states, but the control and governance over a civilian population contested between a constituted government and an organised movement within the same state. In other words, this form of asymmetric warfare is a competition in government, in which each side seeks to dominate the civilian population (Isaac, 2008).

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